My World is Melting

Living with climate change on Svalbard

In 2006, Line Nagell Ylvisåker moved to Svalbard. A climate scientist warned the archipelago would get several degrees warmer. Line didn’t pay much notice. She drove her snowmobiles and got acquainted with the mountains, the midnight sun and the northern lights.

In 2015, an avalanche thundered down from the mountain Sukkertoppen and hit 11 houses in Longyearbyen. A two-year-old girl and a young father died. There were landslides, and houses were evacuated. Line had built a life in Longyearbyen, but she suddenly became uneasy. What was happening to her beloved town? She started to investigate, and even met a meteorologist who was buried in the snow masses. She talked to a climate scientist and a trapper with 40 winterings under his belt. She was shown how the deep sea has systematically warmed up. It was evident times were changing. This is a story about living in the midst of a hot spot of climate change.

A report from the front on the fight against climate change, enlightening and touching.

Focus, Germany

Reads like a startling documentary series.

Stern, Katharina Kluin

… vivid literary nonfiction – filled with poetic, striking and surprising images.

Dagbladet

A story of the climate crisis that is as instructive as it is captivating.

Süddeutsche Zeitung, Germany

In Ylvisåker’s book, the personal experience of the environmental changes is an excellent framework for communicating – knowledge…This easy-to-read and engaging book should have great potential to create understanding for the seriousness of the situation to many – in an ideal world.

Klassekampen

A gripping, forceful plea against the climate catastrophe.

3SAT "Kulturzeit", Germany

An alarming report.

Bremervörder Zeitung, Germany

This easy-to-read and engaging book should have great potential to create understanding for the seriousness of the situation to many – in an ideal world.

Klassekampen

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